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Cheerleader
The tech leader is the biggest cheerleader for the ministry, but they are also in charge of the way the ministry is perceived by people around it.

Volunteer Recruitment: Seek Growth and Development, Versus Culture of ‘Doing’

Finding volunteers is not just up to you on a micro level - it’s the job of the team, but the team needs someone to drive the culture toward continuous invitation, training, and expansion.

Develop a Plan

Tech leaders regularly tell me they are having trouble finding and keeping consistent and knowledgeable volunteers for their ministry. Because or this, they want to know the successful formula for growing a team. This formula can vary for every church, but there are a few core themes that regularly come up in a healthy tech volunteer environment, and a culture of growth, starting with a plan and being intentional in growing your team. 

If you are interested in learning more about leadership, check out the following session, "Self-Development for Leaders: Leading from the Inside Out," slated for the WFX Conference & Expo this November in Orlando.

Do you have a plan to develop, to expand your tech volunteer culture? 

It Starts with a Leader 

As the tech or production director, it starts with you. No one cares about your ministry as much as you do. 

Growth potential lives and dies with you and your enthusiasm for your team, and the goals you hope that team can accomplish. 

No one is going to do it for you. 

Most church tech leaders think they are brought on to push buttons and run tech, which is a common misconception. If there is a larger vision, that AVL technology is a part of it, and a Lead Pastor knows that a TD is not just there to “do,” but actually to lead a group of people that “do.”  The tech leader is a pastor for those people. 

Intentional Expansion 

Tech leaders often feel pressure to recruit people to the team directly. While it is important to always be striving toward a goal of growth, church tech leaders are not responsible for this alone. It’s time for the Body to be the Body, and think of tech as an area of outreach and eventual assimilation - similar to so many other ministries in the church. 

What if that long-time graphics operator invited someone from their 9-to-5 job, to sit in with them on Sunday to learn ProPresenter? What if your audio tech for the last 15 years, invited someone from their community group to shadow them for a month, so there could be some depth in the tech team roster? 

Finding volunteers is not just up to you on a micro level - it’s the job of the team, but the team needs someone to drive the culture toward continuous invitation, training, and expansion. 

There are people in your church, right now, with amazing abilities that just need an invite and an open door to serve - but you personally could never reach them. Through community with others that might already be on your team, these new volunteers are only an “ask” away. 

Motivation 

It’s no secret that people want to be part of something bigger than themselves. Have you ever asked yourself “why would someone want to be part of this tech team”? What motivates them toward or away from your ministry? Would I want to be part of this volunteer team? If so, why? 

The tech leader is the biggest cheerleader for the ministry, but they are also in charge of the way the ministry is perceived by people around it. Often, tech ministry can give off a sense that it is a closed environment, or a boys club, or an elite group - all things which are nowhere near Biblical or encouraging toward a Gospel-centered community. 

People with limited tech knowledge often feel like “those tech people” do their thing, and that it is not for them - when in reality, a strong and inviting tech leader can change the perception by demystifying tech for people and creating genuine relationships, not just based on service. 

Culture is King 

Yes, yes … Jesus is really King, but it takes a constant, healthy culture and development of that culture, to see successful growth within tech ministry. It’s never going to “just happen”! An objective tech leader is often a successful one that will see ministry growth. Button pushers can expect more of the same. 

I encourage tech leaders to ask “Why?” frequently, to regularly confirm that their actions and leadership, are leading to growth and development, versus a culture of “doing.” 

We can get so bogged down with the day-to-day events and little things, that leadership of the ministry takes a back seat to just getting things done. 

If you stay objective and focus on culture development, you’ll be pleasantly surprised to find your ministry naturally growing and overflowing with engaged and empowered tech volunteers.

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