Christmas Production: Using Story Structure in Tech to Create the Best Experience

We need to be asking, does tech in services enhance enough, to support the message? Does it improve the service and help more people discover your church?

Christmas may be the best time to be creative, and here is why:

Being creative means taking a risk at an especially important time, but the risk can also result in a big payoff.

By partnering with pastors and other ministries when casting a vision, the tech team can ignite the passion of the audience.

Christmas is by far the most notable time when vast numbers of new people attend church services. It therefore is one of the best opportunities to engage current and prospective attendees and make that great first impression.

People crave more substance with the rise of social media and news on devices; that is the same with connection to church, God and community.

The good news is that the people who are most likely to attend a church event are already looking for a way to connect with God and community.

By partnering with pastors and other ministries when casting a vision, the tech team can ignite the passion of the audience. A successful service is no different than a great novel or movie which has steps to story building.

Right now is the best time to engage storytelling tools in tech, as business, industries and communities are becoming aware of the extreme importance of storytelling for most forms of communication and live performances.

Use the same techniques in audio/visual as in writing or performing, such as:
Grabbing your listener's attention with a unique, exciting or unexpected element.
Giving your congregation an emotional experience by telling a story with tech elements that support and enhance the understanding of the spiritual message and spiritual connection.
Helping listeners digest the message and make memories that connect with God.

Listeners will not stay engaged if they are not interested or excited by the message. Attendees won't remember the message or story, unless they can feel and connect in a space where they feel comfortable and the sound and visuals are clear.

The sermon and plan should have the elements of a good story. 

Break the plan, message, hymn/song into beats, and plan the tech elements (lighting, sound, etc.) to the beat of each piece. This is the easiest way to match the appropriate tech element to the message.

Focus on the elements that will make the story better.

For lighting and visual, look at adding texture, color, and layers to warm or cool, as well as focus to a beat.

Also consider adding other elements such as: shapes, repeating patterns, layers of depth, focal points, highlighting interesting elements, perimeter lighting, dynamic movement, lighting that extends into the congregation, and architectural elements.

For visuals, try incorporating titles, overlays, images, dynamic slides, videos and transitions, if not already being used.

For audio, use clear, articulated sound, correct volume, great coverage, and when appropriate, sound bites or effects.

We need to be asking, does tech in services enhance enough, to support the message? Does it improve the service and help more people discover your church?

Are we meeting attendees' expectations?

For A/V, adding new elements is an added plus that involves taking on more difficult and interesting features, creating new learning experiences, challenges and opportunities to grow skills.

This is a good reminder that the A/V team needs to stay innovative and flexible, with solutions that keep up with the fast pace of technology.

As a team, remember to explain tasks in easy terms for the "technically challenged," and to fully support each team member.

Of course, the elements of a good story still start with planning, managing and testing.

Avoid mistakes by starting early, to make choices that solve challenges facing the Christmas event now. Make sure to confirm volunteers and rentals as early as possible. Invite enough help to cover any last-minute cancellations and always have a plan B.'

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish