Worship Facilities is part of the Informa Markets Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Tech needs
When it comes to actually requesting new equipment to be purchased, you need to be able to go beyond the technical details of why your upgrade is important.

Advocating for Tech Needs to Church Administration: Asking Is A Required Step

When it comes to actually requesting new equipment to be purchased, you need to be able to go beyond the technical details of why your upgrade is important.

It’s that time of year, when the budget and upgrade planning for the next year are in full swing.

It is important to faithfully follow through on the things in your ministry and utilize the equipment you have in the best possible way.

As a technical director, there a lot of decisions you need to make in terms of how you want to plan out your upgrades, and the direction you want to go with your ministry.  While small items are usually an easy sell when presented to church administration, how do you convince people that a large purchase is necessary, to keep your ministry moving forward?

The first step in this process comes long before the actual proposal. It’s trust. In Luke 16:10 NIV, Jesus says “Whoever can be trusted with very little, can also be trusted with much, and whoever is dishonest with very little, will also be dishonest with much.”  

It is important to faithfully follow through on the things in your ministry and utilize the equipment you have in the best possible way.

Having a plan for what you need, and the direction of your overall ministry is important to have for yourself, before putting forth a proposal to your administration. Knowing your goals will help you put together a proposal that is articulate and well thought out. This plan should include some options for phasing in parts of new technology, as well as having a plan to replace end of life equipment.

Planning shouldn’t be stressful, so reach out to others and take a look at the following article.

When it comes to actually requesting new equipment to be purchased, you need to be able to go beyond the technical details of why your upgrade is important. What is this upgrade going to do to help facilitate your church’s mission? How does it align with the overall goals of the church? These are things that are critical when church administration looks at when deciding what will and won’t go into a budget.

If things don’t align with the mission of the church, there is less of a chance that this will be a high priority item to be replaced or added. One good example of this could be the need to purchase an adapter to connect your phone to your projector, in order to share Facetime videos from a missionary with your congregation.

Face-to-face conversations to outline your tech needs and goals will be far more effective than sending an email or written proposal. An in-person meeting will allow you to show passion and excitement around your ministry. When doing this, keep in mind your audience may not have as deep of a technical knowledge as you, so be sure to keep it at a level that is understandable to everyone that is part of the discussion.

The final thing to consider when advocating for tech needs, is that no one else is going to do this for you.

If you don’t ask for things, you will never get them.

One thing that I have found over the years is that just because I’ve been told “no,” regarding something at one point, doesn’t mean I can’t revisit it again a year or so later. Recognize that sometimes the ideas that you have now, may not be able to be implemented immediately. Take time in prayer and let God lead your ministry, so it can grow for His glory.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish