Team Development: Asking Yourself, ‘Who Owns It?’

Team Development: Asking Yourself, ‘Who Owns It?’

Trust is as much about anticipating success as it is about accepting failure, as long as something is learned in the process.

Realizing the Need

Your church needs more tech volunteers.

Ownership of ministries by volunteers means that people understand they are the hands and feet of Christ.

It's not a question, as much as it is an obvious statement.

Churches need people to make things happen, and tech ministry requires the right people for a very specific job. These people must be wired a certain way, often as creative problem solvers but they often require a very unique personality trait when growth and transformation is desired, the ability to "own it." The project or task is theirs through to completion, without micromanagement, for the obvious purpose of benefiting the church and facilitating ministry.

So how do we get to a place where people "own it," and realize that what they do matters, and that the choices they make are valuable and trusted by church leadership?

It's about finding leaders who you can trust, and developing them to do the same.

Identifying Leaders

Leaders can't help but lead. Our team was recently blessed to integrate and be present for the launch of a new audio, video and lighting system in a youth room at a church in Gladstone, Missouri. This youth facility had some of the latest tech gear ProPresenter, Jands Vista, a digital audio console, laser projection all tools that require someone with a vision to use them effectively.

Leading up to the launch, there was the continuing question of "who is going to determine the what' of production in this space?"

During training of the system, a few days before system launch on the weekend, a group of 13-14 year-old boys attended training, looking to see if they could help. We were incredibly pleased to see a natural structure of leadership between these guys, with the goal of using these systems for the benefit of the church.

We watched as each person found their niche in the areas of audio, video, or lighting and attempted to learn everything they could to do a great job. One of these young men showed the incredible ability to "drive the bus." Someone had to say "what" they were all doing. This person was a natural producer and leader of tech people. I watched as he would ask (at 14 years old!) for specific cues or relay immediate needs, but not demand them he communicated a sense of urgency and importance of what they were all doing together. He owned it.

Real Ownership

Trust is as much about anticipating success as it is about accepting failure, as long as something is learned in the process. How can a church tech volunteer learn to take risks that pay off, if they don't feel accepted if they happen to fail? It's important to lead from a place of grace, expecting high-quality work, but understanding the realistic limits of the people on your team.

Grace is giving someone the opportunity to not be perfect, but expecting him or her to be as good as they can be. Grace requires taking risks and getting your church leadership involved. Does you pastor always expect perfection? Is there any relationship with the people on your stage and the people in the booth?

The tech leader's role is one of connection, blurring the lines of ministry communication in weekend production. Your team will truly begin to own their roles when they know they are connected to something bigger than themselves and know that someone in leadership sees what they do and cares for them.

The Bigger Picture

Why do we want our volunteers to "own it"? Truth is, we can go to church, push buttons, make sound/video/lights happen, and leave and no one would bat an eye.

We are called for something more.

Ownership of ministries by volunteers means that people understand they are the hands and feet of Christ. The tech/production team is the last filter for the Word to enter the eyes and ears of your congregation.

When they own it, it truly means they are being good stewards of a gift they have been given to help tell the most important story there is to tell.

 

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