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Training for teams
There are so many good things that come from training nights: you start seeing more people with the gift of training others, you will see an improvement in the quality of your weekend services, and you will see an increased ownership in knowledge about your ministry area’s equipment.

Team Development: Building A Living Legacy

If we want to be developing others, it is imperative that you and your development team have regular training nights. These are nights that provide real-time learning opportunities for new recruits or trainees on your team.

As leaders, we want our ministry areas to grow. We want to continually provide opportunities and wins for the volunteers and teammates we serve with, on a regular basis.

We love the work we do and the people we do it with, but we feel like there is more to it than just weekend services and events. It’s like there is another level that you and your team can get to, but it’s eluding you.

My friend, that is the deep desire for team development.
 

Develop A Strong Core

I have a riddle for you Batman! What does Yoga have to do with your production team? The answer? In order to do both well, you must have a strong core!

All Riddler jokes aside, if you want a ministry with a developing culture, it is important that you build a strong core team. I call this team, simply enough, my development team. These are people who devote themselves to improving the skills and relationships of others on our production team.

Your core team should be comprised of people who get it. What do I mean by get it? I mean those that are already teaching and growing people on your team, without you telling them to do so. Do any faces pop into your head when you read that? If so, begin intentionally inviting them into shaping your ministry area with you. You will be surprised to see what a team of people working together to grow others can do, as opposed to your efforts alone.

Have Routine Open Training Nights

If we want to be developing others, it is imperative that you and your development team have regular training nights. These are nights that provide real-time learning opportunities for new recruits or trainees on your team.

There are so many good things that come from these training nights: you start seeing more people with the gift of training others, you will see an improvement in the quality of your weekend services, and you will see an increased ownership in knowledge about your ministry area’s equipment.

I am sure you do not want to be at the church on nights, that you do not have to be there. I like to maximize my time, and my family’s time, by doing volunteer training during our worship rehearsals. It is an amazing simulated environment, that gets as close to the weekend service as possible.

All your training nights must be consistent. Don’t do any of these nights, expecting to give passive effort. I want to encourage you to build a “takeaway” sheet for the night. I normally write three things on my takeaways: the big idea, the bible verse that pertains to the training, and the skill they learned from the night.

The Dinner Table

All this development cannot be done without relationship; without people trusting in you. That is where the dinner table comes in to play.

Jesus did a remarkable amount of ministry from the dinner table. For example, John 13 – 17 is a whole conversation that Jesus has with his friends over a meal. There is a significant amount of trust that can be built by you over a meal. Invite a key team member and their family into your home and share your life with them. Get to know their story, their joys, and their passions. You will see a striking difference in how far you can move a relationship at the dinner table, versus the conference table at your church.

Leave A Legacy

In the 19th century, there was a famous industrialist and business tycoon named Andrew Carnegie. He is known to be one of the savviest and richest businessmen in the history of the United States. Carnegie wasn’t just a sharp businessman, he was a profound philanthropist, and people person as well. He told his associates that he would like to have written on his tombstone: “Here lies the man who was able to surround himself with men far cleverer than himself.” At the memorial of Carnegie’s 150th birthday, a speaker noted, “The organizations he left us, are a living legacy to his brain trust.”

We are building a living legacy when we invest in others.

Developing people is not about accomplishing more work. The real work is done when we develop people.

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