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The role of a creative director
Creative directors determine the artistic vision of a brand, series, or project and manifests that vision, so it comes alive.

Roles of A Creative Director, Creative Pastor: Vision Needed

One can be an excellent creative director and have zero pastoral gifting. Neither is more important or better than the other, and they coexist in one person, but not everyone who is one is the other. 

Have you ever wondered what's next?

A lot of us do.

Without this practical application applied to our art, it will be more difficult for our art to move people to their next step. 

The next question is, what do I do to expand my career? If you are in a nonmusical, creative profession, you are probably wondering what the next step looks like for you and your career path.

Often, we figure, I can become the creative director ... or even the creative pastor.

What does that mean? Let's take a look!

First, let's dispel the misnomer that a creative pastor and a creative director are the same jobs.

They are not!

Pastoring and creative direction are not synchronous.

Further, you can be an excellent creative director and have zero pastoral gifting. Neither is more important or better than the other, and they coexist in one person, but not everyone who is one is the other. 

A creative director, by definition, is: 

"A position often found within the graphic design, film, music, video game, fashion, advertising, media, or entertainment industries, but may be useful in other creative organizations.”

A creative director is a vital role in all the various arts and entertainment industries.

In another sense, they can be another thread that makes up the product development process. The creative director may also assume the roles of an art director, copywriter, or lead designer. The responsibilities of a creative director include leading the communication design, interactive design, and concept forward in any work assigned.

In essence, creative directors are responsible for the look, feel, and experience people have. Now, sometimes, and probably most of the time, that is also the role of the creative pastor.

Where things get weird, though, is when a nonpastoral person tries to pastor people who are hurt.

It rarely works. 

As you navigate your steps, there are a couple of things to think about, and a few questions to ask:

1. Do you care more about cool or connectivity? 

If you only care about how cool things are, you probably are missing the point of art in ministry. Without connection, art is frivolous in our space.

First, your pastor must connect with it, so they can communicate it with passion.

Next, it needs to make sense, to the lowest common denominator.

Third, it should have an easily laid out next step for everyone to take.

Finally, it can't be cool just for the sake of cool.

Now, you can disagree with any or each of these concepts, but the truth is, we #GET2 make art that helps people connect to Jesus.

Without this practical application applied to our art, it will be more difficult for our art to move people to their next step. 

2. People over the product. Always 

The minute we care more about the art or delivery of that art, than we do about the artist, volunteer, or end-user, we have lost our way. Creative directors don't carry this weight the same way creative pastors do, because pastors want to see people achieve the calling in their life.

I have had the privilege of working in each role in my professional career, and I will tell you, there is nothing like seeing people become all God intended them to be. It is life changing for them and you! 

3. Both roles require vision! 

Creative directors determine the artistic vision of a brand, series, or project and manifests that vision, so it comes alive.

Creative pastors do the same.

Regardless of your role, you must be praying for vision! Always cast a vision for what is next in terms of look, opportunity, or technology. In addition, make sure to never allow the vision of the creative team to stand in contrast with the vision and purpose of your church! 

4. Protect the brand! 

Creative leaders, in general, have a responsibility for protecting the brand. As innovative leaders, creativity and communication of that creativity are our ministries.

We shouldn't expect the kid's team, youth team, groups team, or quilt ministry team to be excellent at these things.

It is the gift God gave us.

So, protect it.

Never settle.

The minute you settle, you permit other ministries to do less than work. Keep the brand standards high, be willing to say no, always coach why clarity and excellence matters, and remember, don’t settle

5. Stay Positive! 

Artists have a propensity for drifting negative. That is a gift of their ability to connect with their feelings.

As a leader, your job is to keep people positive. Don't allow them to drift, don't let them stay in a negative place for too long.

Point them to the possibility and protect and value them at all costs. When you do this, and they know they can trust you, you can become the positivity they need. 

No matter your role, title, or position, God desires to use your creativity, like never before.

He has a plan for you and your team, and He is full of anticipation of what is about to happen next because he already knows!

Be diligent.

Be a servant.

Give your best and remember; there is "Never Just Another Sunday!".

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