spiritual health
A physically very unfit person would be ill-advised to go out this weekend and run a marathon. I might suggest, though, that they become conscious of what they are eating, that they drink more water than they have been, and take more exercise than they have been, more regularly than they have been.

Spiritual Health: Aim For Ways To Be ‘Healthier’

If I am going to maintain a high standard of physical health and well-being, it is going to take effort on my part and it’s going to take a healthy routine. The very same applies to our spiritual health.

 

 

As a 50-year old man, I can look back over the state of my physical health during my life to date and recognize a couple of things. First, I have had periods of time during those years, where I might have been in so-called ‘tip-top’ shape from a fitness standpoint. At the same time, I have also had time during those years, where I’d admit ‘not-so-much’!

Our spiritual health, in turn, influences our ability to do what needs to be done in the spiritual, and how much impact we can make on other people and their spiritual walk.

Here’s the truth about the state of my physical health over the years … a truth that no doubt applies to you and that you are already fully aware of - the times that I have been at my most healthy, is when I have been consciously making the right decisions regarding my health.

Our bodies respond to the way that we treat them. They are affected by what we put in them or what we neglect to put in them - how much exercise we give them or deny them - and how much rest we take or otherwise.

If I am going to maintain a high standard of physical health and well-being, it is going to take effort on my part and it’s going to take a healthy routine.

The very same applies to our spiritual health.

If we are going to be spiritually healthy, it is going to take effort on our part, and it’s going to take a healthy routine.

Our spiritual health is essential, because it is what determines the choices and decisions we make about everything, and it is also what determines how equipped we are to help other people in their own spiritual journey.

As a pastor, I know that I can’t lead people to somewhere that I am not, and nor can I give people what I do not possess.

If I am spiritually drained and my ‘tank’ is running on empty, there is no way that I can get myself where I need to be, let alone set the pace and lead the way for other people to get there as well.

That principle is not limited to pastors, though, and applies to each and every one of us that have anything to do at all with serving in ministry, irrespective of the capacity in which we serve.

Our physical health influences our ability to do what needs to be done in the physical, and the quality and longevity of our physical lives.

Our spiritual health, in turn, influences our ability to do what needs to be done in the spiritual, and how much impact we can make on other people and their spiritual walk.

Personally, I do not want a lack of spiritual health to prevent me from helping others and potentially holding them back.

So how do we maintain a high level of spiritual health and ‘fitness’? Well, we do for our spiritual being what we would (and should) do for our physical being. We develop healthy and consistent routines and make the best choices we can, as often as we can about what we ‘feed’ ourselves.

People ask me regularly about what they need to do to improve their spiritual well being, their relationship with God, and even occasionally how to become physically fitter! My answer is always along these lines - I can tell you what I do, but that is what works for me, and that is based on where I am with my fitness level where it is. What you need to do, is what will work for you, and needs to be based on where you are currently.

A physically very unfit person would be ill-advised to go out this weekend and run a marathon.

I might suggest, though, that they become conscious of what they are eating, that they drink more water than they have been, and take more exercise than they have been, more regularly than they have been.

In other words, wherever they are at - I’d advise they change their routine to include more things that are good for them, and less things that are bad for them, so to be more active than they have been.

Likewise, if someone asks me for advice on how to improve their spiritual health and they have not been in church for ten years and don’t own a bible, I’m not going to tell them to go read the whole of the New Testament in the next six weeks.

I am, however, going to advise them to develop a routine where they are reading some of the bible (even if it’s just a verse or two) each day, attend church more than they have been, and get connected to people that can help them further their walk.

The bottom line is this - “healthy” (whether physically or spiritually) is a very subjective word.

What one person uses as their yardstick for determining whether someone is healthy is going to be a different standard to one that someone else may apply. As a result - I might not be able to necessarily judge whether or not I am ‘healthy’ - and if I do decide I am not healthy, I may not have the first idea of how to get to that level.

What we can all do though, whether relating to the physical, the spiritual, or both, is not ask “am I healthy?”, but rather ask ourselves this question - ‘could I be healthier?’

If you ask that question of yourself and answer it ‘yes,’ then make a decision that moving forward, you will do more of the good things than you have been, less of the bad things than you have been, and become more active than you have been.

May I wish you a Merry Christmas, and a very happy, very healthy 2019!

 

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