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IMAG Systems
The approach we took to successfully implement IMAG was taking our already dedicated team of volunteers, utilizing their gifts and talents.

IMAG Systems: With Buy-In from Leadership, Change Within Reach

Going IMAG during worship is a huge shift for a church, requiring an all-in mentality from our pastors and leader.

Doing something new in production can be very challenging. People resist change by nature, so any time you make a drastic change - such as implementing IMAG - on something that people are used to being a certain way, there tends to be a natural tendency to avoid doing it.

Whenever we do something new, we look through the lens of, how does this add to the environment?

However, there is something in all tech leaders, to want to make something better – all the time, to where pretty soon – you risk facing irrelevancy.

Our church is known for doing everything with excellence. Whenever we do something new, we look through the lens of, how does this add to the environment?

With the assistance of one of the brightest tech leaders I have gotten to work with, Joe Harrell, we developed a plan to best implement this.

The approach we took was taking our already dedicated team of volunteers, utilizing their gifts and talents.

First, we had to get the equipment in place to make it happen. Then we had to teach them, followed by having to practice, practice, and more practice.

1. Equipment

We started working toward having four cameras (which we believe is the minimum) for our IMAG launch. Our chosen configuration includes two Sony PMW300K1 cameras at the back of the room, one Sony PXW320 floor camera, and a Marshall Electronics CV502-MB camera for our drum cage, working in tandem with our video switcher and other peripherals.

2. Teach

For the first few weeks of INFUSE, which is what we call our training, we watched worship videos to learn what were the most ideal camera shots to capture.

After a couple of weeks of watching those videos, we felt we were ready to start practicing, but we did not have all the desired cameras at that moment to do so. Our solution was to use some old cameras that we still had available, one for a drum cam and the other for our mobile cam position.

Before we knew it, we were up and running.  

3. Practice

We began by practicing when our worship team rehearsed on Thursday nights, when there was no pressure, compared to what they’d face during a weekend service.

Once we were moving in the right direction, about two months in, we began practicing on the weekend, while still utilizing jumpbacks with lyrics overlaid.

During every rehearsal and gathering, we recorded the “clean” feed of our video switcher, so we could review it and see how the team was doing.

Because we decided to record them all early on, we were able to show our leadership. Our leadership team then got behind us, which was needed.

Going IMAG during worship is a huge shift for a church, where it requires an all-in mentality from our pastors and leader.

We were able to do this, because of the buy-in we got from our team and leadership, by leading with vision of what it could accomplish.

 

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