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Lifting Barriers so TECH can Participate In Worship

Lifting Barriers so TECH can Participate In Worship

One of the challenges a tech ministry faces is finding time and space to participate in corporate worship. The struggle is embedded in the tech's attention to their job, performing it and enabling the congregation to worship distraction-free.

One of the challenges a tech ministry faces is finding time and space to participate in corporate worship. The struggle is embedded in the tech's attention to their job, performing it and enabling the congregation to worship distraction-free.

As a church leader, if you see your tech team members serving frequently, or perhaps even every weekend, this means that their spirit isn't being renewed through corporate worship. I imagine this is one of the reasons tech team members so frequently express being burned out.

However, I do think that it is possible, and even necessary, for techs to participate in worship and serve in tech ministry at the same time. But for this to happen, there are some barriers that need to be lifted by the church leadership and worship ministry leaders.

I think the biggest barrier to participation in the time of worship that is taking place is the tech's lack of a thorough understanding of what's taking place during the service. If things are vaguewhat's happening next, who will be speaking, what mic they will be using, etc, the tech team can't participate.

Instead, they are worrying about what's going to happen, when it might happen, and are focusing on clues from the stage as to what's happening next. You can't be sweating the details and be engaged in worship at the same time.

But when the service order is thoroughly communicated, and it's well understood what is going to happen when, where, by whom, and using what microphones, then the tech team can plan out their transitions (even pre-program their transitions) so that instead of constantly watching for the unknown, they can relax and engage in the spirit of worship.

This also has the additional benefit that the service will go far more smoothly, with the right mics being turned on at the right time.

Another barrier is not having sufficient preparation time.

If there is no sound check with the band and speakers; if the tech team doesn't know what instruments are going to be used for the service until the musicians walk in the door, this makes pre-service preparations stressful and chaotic, and often turns your first (and perhaps only) service into the tech rehearsal. Instead of participating in worship, they are trying to get the mix dialed in.
This leads to no time of worship for the tech team members, and an underwhelming experience for the congregation as well.

Advanced preparation and communication is the key to enabling your tech team to worship and not merely serve.

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