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Production
Invite members of the production team into a discussion with you, concerning the needs of the production ministry. Share your vision with them and allow them the opportunity to speak into what the actualization of your vision might look like.

Empowering Your Production Team: Include, Then Release

If we're going to keep the bar high and continue to produce services underpinned by excellence, then we must empower those who are ministering in this arena.

I recently guest-led worship at a church, one that had just made some upgrades to their sound system.

Production is a key tenet of the modern church.

Among those updates, a new speaker array, an in-ear monitoring system, and new wireless mics, were just some of the highlights of this major renovation.

With great enthusiasm, I was told, "You'll be the first person to lead worship with these new upgrades in place!" I was apprehensive, to say the least.

That Sunday, I felt less like a worship leader, and more like a guinea pig. (I was there to lead worship, not break in new gear.)

More disconcerting was the fact that the techs using the gear seemed to know very little, if anything, about the gear.

I would love to say that despite the odds, everything worked out well, but it didn't.

The odds were clearly stacked against us, and it showed.

There were issues with the gain-staging on my mic, the monitor mix was unbalanced, the house mix was unbalanced, and the projection system failed, with it taking more than half the service to get it up and running again.  

So, what went wrong?

Do you remember when I said that the techs using the gear seemed to know very little, if anything, about the gear? There was a reason for that. None of them were included in any of the decision-making process that led to the upgrades.

All the decisions behind what ended up being purchased for gear (which amounted to tens of thousands of dollars) were made by senior leadership, none of whom were engaged in the regular operation of the equipment.

What went wrong?

The senior leadership failed to transfer ownership to those responsible for executing the production of the church.

It’s like asking your friend to drive you home, but at the same time insisting on holding the wheel from the passenger's seat. This was a classic case of responsibility, without authority.

The senior leadership laid the burden of production on the techs but didn't empower them to carry it forward.

Production is a key tenet of the modern church.

If we're going to keep the bar high and continue to produce services underpinned by excellence, then we must empower those who are ministering in this arena.

Here are four tips for empowering your production team.

  1. Include them: Invite them into a discussion with you, concerning the needs of the production ministry. Share your vision with them and allow them the opportunity to speak into what the actualization of your vision might look like.
  2. Release them to run it down: Give them the opportunity to brainstorm and research solutions for the needs of your production ministry.
  3. Converse with them: Keep the lines of communication open, by allowing for ample opportunity to bat ideas and logistics around.
  4. Release them to execute the plan: Once you have a corporative plan in place for the needs of your production ministry, release responsibility and authority to your team. Then get out of the way. Always keep the lines of communication open but avoid the pitfall of micromanagement.
     
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