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Bad Sound May Not Be The Sound System

Bad Sound May Not Be The Sound System

This short piece is an attempt to shed some light on three possible causes of bad sound, two of which have been completely unaffected by the technological revolution.

Many things around us are getting better. Computers are faster, televisions have more resolution, and dishwashers are quieter and more powerful than ever.

But with all of our digital wiz-bang processors, technology has been unable to eradicate "bad sound." Why is this so? This short piece is an attempt to shed some light on three possible causes, two of which have been completely unaffected by the technological revolution.

The goal of most sound reinforcement systems is to deliver high quality sound reproduction to the listener. While we would like to think that a high quality sound system guarantees this, it does not.

The quality of the reproduced sound will only be as good as the weakest link in the reproduction chain. Let's examine some of the major "links" individually.

The Room
The room is a major factor in the reproduction chain. Most large spaces are hostile environments for sound systems, unless they have received special attention from a professional and a considerable financial investment from their owner. Good acoustics doesn't just "happen." It is the by-product of careful planning.

A quality sound system may radiate an exceptionally high-fidelity sound field into the room. Unfortunately, most of the radiated energy will create acoustic events that detract from the listening experience. While small rooms have their share of acoustic problems, these problems pale next to the late reflections, reverberation, and energy build-ups encountered in large spaces.

If your sound system doesn't sound good, ask yourself the question "What have I done to provide a good acoustic environment?" If the answer is "nothing," then you got what you paid for.

The Sound System
Of course, a good sound system is a vital link in the reproduction chain. But this doesn't just mean expensive equipment. It means that equipment that is suitable for the environment has been selected and implemented by someone who understands the compromises involved in large room reinforcement systems. Money can be wasted on "features" that offer no real benefit for the large room environment.

The vast majority of auditoriums that I have visited are not suitable for multi-channel formats such as stereo, surround sound, etc. since each channel must be delivered to all listener seats. Loudspeaker placements that are optimal for stereo reproduction are horrible choices for single-channel systems.

Even with monaural systems, "first choice" loudspeaker placements often create problems with sight lines and aesthetics, and are therefore ruled out by venue owners. Multiple loudspeakers must overlap somewhere, and there will be sound problems in these areas.

A properly designed system will often sound bad in the aisles the very place where casual onlookers will stand to evaluate it. We all have good sound at home, but the rules change as the listening space grows. Intuition that is not filtered through the proper large-room principles leads to errors.

Sound system designers are often forced to compromise away the performance of the system to make it fit aesthetic concerns, budget limitations, and fashion trends within the industry.


The Operator
I've intentionally saved this one until last. The most overlooked link in the chain is the end user of the system. This includes the mixer operator and any supporting staff, such as those who run the monitors and place microphones.

A monitor system that is too loud will dump excessive energy (usually low/mid frequency) into the audience area. This excess energy will upset the spectral balance of house sound system, tempting the front-of-house operator to compensate by over equalizing (usually in the form of high frequency boost). This results in a reduction in gain-before-feedback and an unnatural sounding system. Microphone placement is equally critical, as is an understanding of the shortcomings of various miking techniques.

If a lapel mic could sound like a hand-held, then no one would use hand-helds. The overhead drum mic that captures the cymbals also captures the stage monitors and "spill" from other instruments, as does the vocal mic used at arm's length. And that "mellow" bass guitar sound that the musician likes in the practice hall turns to "mush" in a large space, where increased definition provided by the use of a pick and brighter strings may be required.

These factors and many more "eat away" at the sound quality of the system as a whole. A good mixer operator will evaluate and optimize the sound of the instruments individually before allowing the band to perform as an ensemble. There's no room for democracy here effective mixer operators learn to say "no" and "be quiet."

A question that I recommend for an interview of prospective mix personnel would be "What will you do if something starts to squeal?" If the answer is anything other than "Turn the offending channel down slightly until I figure out what the problem is" move on to your next applicant. Filters implemented in desperation do nothing to preserve sound quality.

Modern mixing consoles pack a considerable "wow factor." It's fashionable to sit behind a large one and move knobs all of the time. But doing so doesn't make one an engineer. Completing an accredited academic program or piloting a locomotive does. The decision as to which console to purchase is often made with no consideration as to whether anyone at the facility will be able to operate it. The result? Bad sound.

I have personally witnessed the performance of many good sound systems ruined by bad rooms and incompetent operators. I have also seen skilled operators "salvage" the sound reproduction in situations where the room and system were less than optimal.

The performance of a sound system is only as good as its weakest link. Unfortunately, all of the links that I have mentioned are of roughly equal importance, meaning that "two out of three" isn't good enough. Good sound requires all three.

Experienced, well-trained audio people realize this and are there to help you find your weakest link. Pay for their advice and follow it.

Pat & Brenda Brown lead SynAudCon, conducting audio seminars and workshops online and around the world. For more information go to www.prosoundtraining.com.

SynAudCon is now offering "Audio Applications System Optimization & EQ" as web-based training. Click the link to see the related article.

Article Courtesy of ProSoundWeb Church Sound

TAGS: Audio Audio
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