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Church bulletins
It might not seem to match where we are as a society, but if your church isn’t at a place where they can get rid of bulletins, without providing another means of communicating necessary information, then bulletins must remain.

Not So Easy to Say Goodbye to Church Bulletins

Some churches have adapted quickly to adding screens to help with their worship services, while others aren’t quite there yet, and still use paper bulletins.

We live in a high-tech world, and many churches have adopted technology into the life of the church.

For those churches who aren’t using screens to project events and announcements, paper bulletins are often still used in worship services.

Church offices are running more efficiently, graphic designers are creating high-quality marketing pieces, websites are becoming more streamlined, and our meeting spaces are becoming equipped with technological equipment, which makes worship seemingly more adaptable to life as we know it. 

It is difficult to argue with the technological benefits we are afforded in our present day and age, but how does it all fit within our church community, when churches worship so differently?

Communicating quickly has become a necessity.

Most of us are walking around with a handheld computer, that at any moment can provide an email, text, website, or make a phone call, without needing to be physically connected to anything. There is no arguing the conveniences we are able to take advantage of, thanks to technology.

As we transition from living our day-to-day lives, to entering a church building and taking part in worship, the variety of what a particular church offers, technology wise, differs depending on many things: available funds to purchase equipment, church leadership views, available space – to name a few.

Some churches have adapted quickly to adding screens to help with their worship services, by displaying events, orders of worship, sermon notes, and song lyrics. Others aren’t quite there yet, and still use paper bulletins, pulpit announcements and hymnals during worship.

And yet, others might not feel they will ever bring such technological items into a worship service.

For those churches who aren’t using screens to project events and announcements, paper bulletins are often still used in worship services. It might not seem to match where we are as a society, but if your church isn’t at a place where they can get rid of bulletins, without providing another means of communicating necessary information, then bulletins must remain.

The content and use of a bulletin can vary. A church might only use a bulletin to advertise upcoming events, while another might depend on it to lead a congregation with a printed order of worship, including responsive readings and song lyrics. These are pieces and parts of a service that require some form of knowledge, for a church member to take part in worship.  

It’s difficult to put a church bulletin into a cookie cutter, because they are all different and they can provide for a variety of different congregational needs. If your church still uses paper bulletins, then have faith!

You are not alone.

By giving clear printed directions, simplifying your messaging, and being consistent with style and design, your bulletin can be an integral, useable, and beneficial addition to worship.

Worship is about coming together with like-minded believers, to a place where glorifying God takes precedence.

Whether your church uses screens or paper bulletins to forward the work of the church, the main goal should be to bring those together who want to live, grow, and serve in a way that glorifies God.   

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