What Your Church Leadership Needs to Know About Easter Events

What Your Church Leadership Needs to Know About Easter Events

Planning an event requires attention to detail, coordinating efforts with various ministry departments, problem-solving, and keeping leadership informed on the team's progress.

Planning an event requires attention to detail, coordinating efforts with various ministry departments, problem-solving, and keeping leadership informed on the team's progress. 

For some events, you'll need to keep the leader of the ministry department hosting the event (i.e., Children's Pastor) up-to-date.  In other cases, you may need to update the senior pastor.  Regardless of who you're reporting status to, here are several key points as you are planning for upcoming Easter services and events that most leaders will want to know.

#1 Basic information

Name of the event

Ministry department hosting the event

Date of the event

Guest speaker (if applicable)

Theme

Name of Event Planner

Statistics Number of people registered or tickets purchased, percentage of volunteer positions filled, and other relevant data points that point to event planning progress

#2 Key milestones

Significant deadlines the team set for itself to ensure appropriate progress in planning the event.  Examples include booking guest speakers, reserving rooms or the entire church campus, getting volunteers signed up and trained, etc.  Include with each milestone the due date and status (not started, on-track, complete, past due).

#3 Issues

Note any significant issues the team is working through.  This could be a vendor who isn't providing a product or service on-time, team members who're unable to spend time planning this event due to other tasks, etc. Include what you're doing to correct each issue and when you expect to have each resolved.

#4 Current week / upcoming week

Include a brief list of what the team is working on this week and what they'll tackle in the upcoming week.

#5 Overall status

A red, yellow, or green indicator at the top of a status report helps leaders quickly decide if they need to read the details or not.  Green means we're on-time and within budget.  Yellow means we're not in trouble yet, but we have some challenges to overcome.  Red means we're running behind schedule, over budget, or otherwise have a significant issue to manage.

Senior pastors and ministry leaders have several efforts to oversee.  By giving them a quick way to filter the decision of "do I need to dive into this one or not?", you're helping them manage their time more effectively.

The purpose of a status report is to convey information quickly and succinctly to leadership so they're aware of your progress and can help you troubleshoot issues as needed.  By providing a status report on a regular basis, you're also demonstrating that you're carefully monitoring the team's progress and have the situation under control.  This builds trust between you, your team, and the leader(s) you're updating.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish