Church Tech: 5 Foundational Team Building Strategies

Church Tech: 5 Foundational Team Building Strategies

Make no mistake, tech arts in church is a people business. And that is a good thing.

Even though we love to work with gear, people should always be our main focus.

There are so many facets to working with a team made up of staff and/or volunteers.

One of the best parts of being a tech director in a church is the wide variety of things we do to support the ministry of the church. Some is physical work, but most of being a tech director is working with people.

But what is the most important ways a tech director can build a rock star team? That is a great question.

Top Five Ways to Build A Rockstar Tech Team:


In no particular order, here are my top five-

1. Be clear on what you expect.

Each person on your team should know what you expect from the team, not only their outlined tasks, but also pertaining to their work ethic and attitude.

Everyone comes from different backgrounds and work styles. You need to reset this to what you want your team to be. A great team is constantly reminding of what is expected and where the bar is set.

They must know the big picture and feel like they are part of it. That must be ingrained into them line upon line, on a continuing basis.

2. Make sure they know the equipment.

A well-oiled machine works, because the individual parts don't really think about how each of them moves and operates. A well-oiled team works the same way.

Training each member of the team to hone the actual craft of sound, lighting, video, or whatever they are set to do - is critical. Each member of the team should eventually be able to train the next generation of operators with the "team" way of operating whatever gear is used.

The side benefit to this is that they will have way more fun when each member of the team is confident in their skills.

3. They need to know the core values.

Every team member should know what the "Big" picture is. By this I mean, the "Why." Why do we do things the way we do them and why do we do this at all?

This ranges from the core values of the team, to the core values of the organization. These things must be constantly taught, over and over again.

"For precept must be upon precept, precept upon precept; line upon line, line upon line; here a little, there a little." (Isaiah 28:10 NKJV).

4. When the team wins, they win.

People join the tech team for many different reasons. Your job as a tech director is to unify them.

This is where really making your team a team is crucial. And this training will, generally, not seem like training, if you do it right. Team events like appreciation parties or team bowling nights are good, but serving together is even better.

This may be with your church or even on a civic level in your city or community.

Obviously, there are times when you will have an "all team" training night, but it is so important to let the team see each other as people, and not just as button pushers. The camaraderie this will bring is priceless. People watch the backs of those they care about. The strongest teams look out for each other.

5. Make them evangelists.

So many times tech teams feel isolated from what is going on in the church. You as a staff member or key leader may get updated on what great things your church is doing, but your team may never hear these things. Furthermore, most members of your team probably serve in other ministries and have news about the cool and amazing things that God is doing in those ministries churchwide.

By you sharing your insider knowledge (of the good news, not gossip), you will set an example and help them feel more connected to what your church is doing big picture. This will also energize them to share their stories as well.

The opportunities for training as atech director are endless. But don't just stick to the gear.

God has put you in a unique position to not only make events awesome, but to make people awesome. Don't pass that opportunity up.

I promise you will find it truly rewarding. Remember, we "get to do this."

TAGS: Volunteers
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