Role of An Audio Director: Team Building

Role of An Audio Director: Team Building

The aspect of training is a vital part to the role of an audio director, in their never-ending effort toward building a team, where you take the time to invest in each of your team members.

The role of an audio director, with each passing year, has become more prevalent with the increased importance of audio systems within churches.

We all have had people in our lives that have helped us get to the place we are today.

With the advancements in technology, the role of the audio director has become a vital part of a church environment.

From my perspective, if people can't hear the Word, then they can't receive it. Therefore, we must build a team, and this is one of the most important tasks of the audio director.

The audio department can't be solely dependent on one person.

I'm a firm believer that we should be training the people around us, to eventually work ourselves out of a job. What that means is that we should be duplicating our abilities down the line.

I once heard it said that if you see a turtle sitting on top of a fence post, you can always say one thing, that he didn't get up there on his own. We all have had people in our lives that have helped us get to the place we are today. If you now find yourself in the position of an audio director today, I believe you can recall a time when someone invested in you. Take that as a lesson to share your knowledge down the line.

The audio director needs to be building his team, and training is a vital part to that.

Therefore, you need to have people, for instance, that know how to mix for your services.

I like you use a five-step process when it comes to training: Watch Me, Help Me, I Help You, I'll Watch You, and lastly, You Do It and Report Back to Me.

Watch Me is the stage where the volunteer is watching us while we mix and asking questions.

Next is Help Me, the stage where we are teaching them, while they are helping us.

That is followed by I Help You, the stage where we have taught them enough where they can get on the console and can step in and serve as our hands. It's us telling them what to do as the service is being held, where they are basically doing things as we tell them.

After that is I'll Watch You, the stage where we have taught them enough where they can mix on their own. But we are always there to make sure they don't fail, and to catch them before they make a mistake.

Finally, there is You Do It and Report Back to Me, the point where we as leaders have trained them well enough, to where they can work on their own. This is the point where they are ready to mix without your help. This is where we just want a report at the end, to see how it went.

Following each of these steps, our overall goal should be to set them up for success and replicate ourselves as best as possible.

We need to be building our team, not only to ensure the future of the department, but also to create a place in the ministry for people to grow.

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