Role of an Audio Director: Aim for Best Sound, Learn How to Empower Others

In such a role, you should be checking on all your inputs and outputs, to make sure you are getting the absolute best sound that you possibly can. If you need to change the heads on your drum set, then do so.

In the role of an audio director, most of us who are in such a position, fall into two different camps. On one side, the role requires you to mix every single weekend and it is your job to pay close attention to the overall audio experience. Then there is the other side, is where one is tasked in empowering volunteers to mix every weekend.

The more you can improve before rehearsal, the easier your job will be, once you get into it.

Either type of role can have different struggles and rewards.

If you mix every weekend, here are a couple things that I have found out to be helpful.

First, know what you are mixing. You should know each song well, very well. You should have a clear vision of what each song should sound like, and what you are trying to achieve in your room.

Second is going right along with the old saying, "start at the source." You should be checking on all your inputs and outputs, to make sure you are getting the absolute best sound that you possibly can. If you need to change the heads on your drum set, then do so. Is that the best direct input for the bass?

The more you can improve before rehearsal, the easier your job will be, once you get into it.

Third is more of a reflective question: How are you preventing burn out? This is something we all face and it can sneak up on us at any time. You need to make sure you are getting fed spiritually. Only you can answer this, but just make sure you are getting fed, before it is too late.

If you are responsible to empower others, there are a few things that can help along the way as well.

Maybe most important aspect for that, is to set a clear vision for your volunteers. You should be setting up your team to win.

With a clear vision, it is going to help your volunteers know what you expect and what they can do to be successful.

A second way you can help, is to set a time aside for your team to grow. How is the team growing in their craft? How is the team growing spiritually? Is the team growing closer as a team? These are all questions you should be able to answer. Provide a space for people to come and learn, and help them grow.

A third way relates to communication, making it clear and accurate, to help relieve any stress your team is experiencing during rehearsal or services. Let them know of the songs that they are going to be mixing, what you are looking for, and what you are trying to achieve with that song.

The last helpful facet to mention here, is to protect your team from burnout as well. I know many people who serve every single week. and love it. But I also know many people who serve every week and find themselves in a spot where they no longer do.

As a leader, get a gauge for how your team is doing and what you can do to help them.

The audio director role can look different in many different places. This is not an exhaustive list, but the examples noted here are just a few things that I thought would be helpful and allow you to thrive in your role.

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